Posts

Taking Action on Youth Employment

Taking Action on Youth Employment

 Jordan, Middle East, February 7, 2018 – Maximpact Training Network would like to present one of it’s partners Jordan Education for Employment (JEFE).

JEFE was established in 2006 as the first affiliate in the Education For Employment (EFE) Network, and today is one of Jordan’s leading youth employment organizations. Based in Amman, Jordan EFE operates across Jordan, particularly in under-served areas in Irbid and Zarqa.

The EFE Network extends across Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Palestine, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia and Yemen, with support hubs in the USA, Europe, and the UAE.

JEFE’s impact is astounding:

  • Over 5,300 youth in Jordan linked to employment and the wider world of work.
  • 54% of Jordan EFE graduates are young women.
  • 191 employers have hired Jordan EFE alumni.

Their latest program “Jordan Competitiveness Programme” was implemented with the support of USAID to help train and better prepare 853 beneficiaries, of whom more than 600 were placed in full-time jobs. The programme, launched in 2015, has already placed 600 new graduated in private sector. As part of the programme, JEFE led 26 training sessions to better prepare the new graduates for the Jordanian job market.

JEFE, through sponsored programmes, prepares and assists youth and women for employment.

Read two stories of how JEFE helped Hala Hourani (sales assistant) and Shatha Al Qurashi (entrepreneur).

Hala Hourani , JEFE’s Alumna.

Hala Hourani , JEFE’s Alumna.

Hala Hourani

Hala Hourani is a 21-year-old female living in Amman. Hala found herself yearning to pursue a meaningful and fulfilling career; but she had to overcome many obstacles along the way. After her parents retired, she wanted to provide for her family. She hated asking her parents for money and began feeling like a burden to her family.

Hala loved working with people, so she obtained a diploma in Tourism Management and Hospitality. Despite her hard work, Hala had to face the harsh reality that her diploma did not guarantee her a job. She searched for employment for five months, which caused her to be stressed and emotionally exhausted. Hala said, “I began to feel useless. I worked so hard for a diploma and it was put to waste.”

Hala then found hope when she discovered JEFE and enrolled in the hospitality program funded by Drosos Foundation. JEFE provided her with soft skills she needed to work in any hospitality position. She also began to learn the technical skills needed to work in a restaurant and now feels that she can work in any position inside of any restaurant.

Hala not only learned the technical and soft skills needed to work in a restaurant, but she also gained confidence in doing such. Hala’s instructors bragged about her ability to learn quickly. This positive encouragement gave Hala the confidence she needed to find a job. Hala not only learned the skills she needed, but she said she learned how to be a better version of herself. Hala said she now feels confident to accomplish anything that comes her way.

After Hala’s training, JEFE provided her with a job working at Paul Café and Restaurant preparing the various displays shown throughout the cafe.

Hala became passionate about her work and loves her new job. She loves getting the opportunity to work and communicate with people from all over the world and she is enjoying using her creative skills to prepare all of the displays inside of the restaurant.

Hala said she has found the meaning to life. When talking about her plan in the future, Hala said, “If I work hard enough, I want to become a manager of a restaurant. Or possibly own my own restaurant. Without JEFE I don’t believe I would be this optimistic about my future.” With the support of her family and JEFE, Hala has become an example to women around the world to follow their passion. Hala is proud of her job and is excited to continue her career.

Shatha Al Qurashi, JEFE’s Alumna.

Shatha Al Qurashi, JEFE’s Alumna.

Shatha Al Qurashi

Facing a difficult job market, many young university graduates experience that obtaining their degree does not necessarily equal finding a job. Amongst the many struggling to find opportunities to make a living, one was Shatha Al Qurashi (24 years) from Ajloun. For her, the solution was a job training program. In about one year, she went from being unemployed to becoming her own boss.

After graduating with an accounting diploma from Balqaa Applied University, Shatha was looking forward to find a job that would enable her to provide for her parents; a housewife and a retired father from Ausara- Ajloun, as well as her 14 siblings. After 18 months of resultless searches for a job, she began to lose hope.

Fortunately, she stumbled upon an advertisement for a garment assembly line course for women in Ajloun. Offered jointly by UNDP and JEFE under the “Youth Employment Generation Programme in Arab Transition Countries”, the course mission extended beyond training, and promised to facilitate actual job placement for all participating trainees.

Curious about this opportunity, Shatha decided to give it a chance, despite the fact that she had no experience in sewing or garment assembly. By the end of the two-month program, Shatha obtained the practical training needed to become a garment assembly line professional. According to her own testimony, she quickly “started to love sewing and the whole garment industry”. As a part of the program, she was also trained in leadership and entrepreneurial skills, and she asked herself: “Why should I stop at working in a factory? I am capable of becoming my own boss”. Her goal was to start up a business that would allow her to not only make money to support her family, but also help other women by employing them.

Less than a year later, she opened up her own tailoring workshop in Ebeen, a vibrant area in downtown Ajloun. Her workshop is gaining a posi- tive reputation in the local market for its quality production, and she has already signed several production agreements.

Shatha’s vision for the future of her business includes buying more sewing machines and increasing her workforce to 15 female employees. She even envisages herself opening up her own factory in the future. In the meantime, she strives to be a source of inspiration for local women, underlining that with hard work, dreams can be realized.


ImproveYourBusinesswritingskills_campaign

“Together for Youth, With Youth”

The 83 Heads of State and Government who participated in the 5th African Union - European Union Summit in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, November 30, 2017 (Photo courtesy African Union) Posted for media use

The 83 Heads of State and Government who participated in the 5th African Union – European Union Summit in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, November 30, 2017 (Photo courtesy African Union) Posted for media use

By Sunny Lewis

ABIDJAN, Côte d’Ivoire, December 5, 2017 (Maximpact.com  News) – To ensure a sustainable future, the European Union and the African Union are solidifying their decade-old financial and structural cooperation in order to support young people and women.

At the 5th African Union – European Union Summit in Abidjan last week, leaders from 55 African Union and 28 European Union Member States gathered to coordinate with young people and with each other with the primary message, “Together for Youth, With Youth.”

EU President Jean-Claude Juncker said, “Already today, the majority of African citizens are under 25 years old, and by the middle of this century, one in four people on Earth will be African.”

“But this demographic dividend cannot deliver without smart investments,” said President Juncker. “This is precisely why we are going to put our investments in education, in infrastructure, in peace and security, as well as in good governance – all of which will in turn inspire good business environments and create much needed jobs and growth.”

Ahead of the Summit, young leaders from Africa and Europe gathered at a Youth Summit on October 9-11 in Abidjan, and their work intensified in the context of the AU-EU Youth Plugin-Initiative.

The Youth Plug-In Initiative brings together 18 Europeans and 18 Africans to act as youth ambassadors for the 5th AU EU Summit. The youth ambassadors presented their ideas to improve the futures of Africans and Europeans alike to global leaders at the Summit.

A summary of the youth ambassadors’ views on six key topics – education, job creation, governance, peace and security, environment and climate change, as well as culture and the arts – is presented in the Abidjan Youth Declaration.

On the topic of education, the youth ambassadors had two new ideas to present.

The AU-EU Rural Education Action Program (REAP) is a proposed, multipurpose and incentive-based pilot intercontinental program to facilitate access to and the completion of primary and secondary education for children, particularly in rural areas.

REAP focuses on integrating schools in remote and hard-to-reach zones to attract and retain students, especially girls, in schools. It maps hard-to-reach areas and develops “toolkits” that include equipment and training.

The AU-EU Network of Digital Hubs for Primary and Secondary Education envisions an initiative, implemented through a public-private intercontinental partnership with major IT companies, aimed at promoting digital skills and digital connectivity at the earliest stages of education, to unleash the potential of digital technology in the community through youth education, training and support programs.

On the topic of Environment and Climate Change, the youth ambassadors from Europe and Africa agree. They state, “Every day, we move closer to the environmental apocalypse to the detriment of all of us, particularly marginalized groups. Youth inclusion is key to ensure environmental preservation and address climate change; it is up to our generation to change the course.”

“As is stated in the Abidjan Youth Declaration, youth-led initiatives must be supported to counterbalance existing tendencies and interests that work against the environment. African and European youth share the same concerns about biodiversity, desertification, coastal erosion, and unsustainable resource management. As the first generation to bear the brunt of climate change and environmental disruption, we must urgently work together on common challenges. It is crucial that we find inclusive, fair and sustainable ways to govern natural resources both locally and globally,” the youth ambassadors state in the Abidjan Youth Declaration.

The youth ambassadors presented two new ideas to improve human response to environmental issues.

First, they suggest mobilizing youth to monitor infrastructure development projects, while guaranteeing the efficacy of impact assessments, through a new AU-EU Youth Initiative on Sustainable Infrastructural Development they’re calling GREEN ID.

Second, they would introduce a youth-led project which expands across the EU and the AU the use of transparent mobile direct-payment methods to ecosystem services for biodiversity conservation, natural resource management initiatives and risk compensation.

Also in advance of the Abidjan Summit, the 6th EU-Africa Business Forum took place on November 27, where business leaders, investors, innovative start-ups, and young and female entrepreneurs from both continents developed recommendations on how to improve the business and investment climate.

After taking all this input into consideration, the 83 European and African Heads of State and Government set out their joint commitment to invest in youth for a sustainable future.

They committed to focusing their work on four strategic priorities:

  • Mobilizing investments for African structural and sustainable transformation, European leaders presented, and African partners welcomed, the EU’s new External Investment Plan, a €4.1 billion (US$4.8 billion) initiative to draw in €44 billion (US$51.9 billion) of private investments for sustainable development and job creation. Special attention will be paid to enhancing entrepreneurship of women and young people.

The newly launched Sustainable Business for Africa Platform is intended to allow for structured dialogue with the European and African private sector.

  • Investing in people through education, science, technology and skills development

Support for inclusive education and vocational training was highlighted. Leaders also agreed to enhance the mobility of students, staff and academics across the African continent, as well as exchange programs between Africa and Europe, such as ERASMUS+, the European Union funding program for education, training, youth and sport.

  • Strengthening Resilience, Peace, security and governance

Leaders will step up their work to enhance peace and security on both continents, pledging to strengthen strategic, political and operational cooperation between the African Union and European Union, in close partnership with the United Nations.

Support to ongoing work to fight against terrorism was reiterated, including the Multinational Joint Task Force against Boko Haram, the Joint Force of the G5 Sahel and the African Union Mission in Somalia, to all of which the EU is the biggest financial contributor.

  • Managing mobility and migration

European and African leaders reaffirmed their strong political commitment to address the root causes of irregular migration in a spirit of genuine partnership and shared responsibility, and in full respect of international laws and human rights, as well as creating legal pathways for migration.

They stressed the need to improve the conditions of migrants and refugees in Libya, and to provide them with appropriate assistance and to facilitate their voluntary repatriation to their countries of origin, as well as to create solutions for refugees.

Libya is the main gateway for people attempting to reach Europe by sea, with more than 150,000 people making the deadly crossing in each of the past three years.

Fleeing war and poverty, the refugees and migrants – most from Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, Zambia, Senegal, Gambia and Sudan – are smuggled into Libya by a network of criminal gangs on the promise of reaching Europe.

Hundreds of African refugees, many of them young people and women, are being bought and sold in “slave markets” across Libya every week, Al Jazeera reported last week, with many of them held for ransom or forced into prostitution and sexual exploitation to pay their captors and smugglers.

To jointly address the situation of migrants and refugees who fall victim to criminal networks, in particular inside Libya, President Juncker, and High Representative/Vice President Federica Mogherini, United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres and the Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat agreed to set up a joint EU-AU-UN Task Force to save and protect lives of migrants and refugees along the routes and in particular inside Libya.

Efforts will be intensified to enhance intra-African mobility and the free movement of persons within Africa.

On this basis, the European Commission and African Union Commission pledged to put forward concrete projects and programs within three months.


Featured image: Three young boys in El Sereif, North Darfur, Sudan. Today, more than half of all Africans are under 25 years old. (Photo by Albert Gonzalez Farran / UNAMID) Creative commons license via Flickr.

A Child’s Right to Savings

ChildCashRegisterMoneyBy Sunny Lewis

MUMBAI, India, April 14, 2017 (Maximpact.com News) – Gone are the days when the only financial education a child would receive was a piggy bank with a coin or two tucked through the slot and parental instructions to save his or her loose change. Now young people, even street kids, can have access to e-banking thanks to an award-winning social entrepreneur from India.

On April 2, the nonprofit Child & Youth Finance International (CYFI) together with Mastercard launched a unique comprehensive guide on banking and payment products for minors.

The guide, “Safer Payment Products for Minors,” identifies recommended practices on how Financial Service Providers can develop age-appropriate payment products for minors.

These products are intended to promote responsible spending and financial decision making while incorporating functions that allow for parental guidance to help children achieve financial autonomy.

BillimoriaJeroo

Jeroo Billimoria of India is an award-winning advocate for youth financial independence. (Photo courtesy Child and Youth Finance International) Posted for media use

Today’s children can look to social entrepreneur Jeroo Billimoria as an inspiration for their own effective ways of handling of money.

In 2011, Billimoria founded Child and Youth Finance International, which unites policymakers and experts from private, public and civil society sectors to elevate the financial rights of children to a higher priority on national and international agendas.

Worldwide, young people are more tech-savvy and digitally included than ever before, yet many lack the much needed financial know-how to make wise decisions about money later in life,” wrote Billimoria in “Huffington Post.”

The fast-growing world of financial technology offers many opportunities; building the tools needed to successfully include children and youth in banking services, the chance to gain expertise from the private sector, and the impetus to create regulations around the financial needs of youth,” she wrote.

Born in 1965 in Mumbai, India to a family of professionals, Billimoria has dedicated herself to support of the economic rights of children.

She began working with street children in Mumbai, many of whom had run away from home and had no one to depend upon except themselves.

Answering their calls through helplines she established, she realized that many of these children demonstrated the attributes of good entrepreneurs – they were brave, smart, innovative and creative. But they were not integrated into the normal financial system and so were financially vulnerable.

Billimoria decided to make her vision of children having and managing their own savings accounts a reality.

Starting with just her own telephone number and her personal savings, Billimoria founded Child Helpline International, an organization that now helps millions of street children each year in countries around the world.

Billimoria really broke through when she created a fun-loving and mischievous cartoon character called Aflatoun as a fireball from outer space. Aflatoun inspires children to explore and engage with the world around them through activities, stories and games, and teaches them about their rights, and about money.

She developed a curriculum for teaching children to take responsibility for themselves, to plan for a better life, and to save money through school-based Aflatoun Clubs.

Aflatoun educates children about their rights and responsibilities. It equips them with skills to save and manage money, and set up their own social and financial enterprises.

In 2006, one year after she created Aflatoun, Billimoria received the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship, a $1.25 million, three-year core support investment to scale her work and increase her impact.

Today, Aflatoun is an international network of nongovernmental organizations based in Amsterdam. Currently, more than 2.3 million children receive social and financial education each year through more than 27,000 education centers in 109 countries.

Forty percent of students enrolled in the Aflatoun program save small amounts of money each week, building savings that average €2.23 euros per child per year – €2.76 million total.

To date, Aflatoun students have launched 5,177 social enterprises and 11,449 financial enterprises.

In 2012, Billimoria stepped down as executive director of Aflatoun to found another new venture – Child and Youth Finance International.

This global advocacy organization is the one partnering with Mastercard to create the guide for financial service providers, “Safer Payment Products for Minors.”

Walt Macnee, Mastercard Vice Chairman says, “Today’s minors are the adults of tomorrow. As they grow up, we need to ensure that they are prepared to fully participate in the formal and increasingly digital economy. By ensuring that the tools and products that they are given are age-appropriate, we contribute to that preparation.

Many of the tips for children in the minors’ guide are the same that people of any age should abide by.

For instance, the guide advises young people to keep their bank card in a safe place, write strong passwords and don’t share them, and research online websites and companies and read customer reviews before buying anything.

Another tip: “Trust your instincts – if you have any doubts about a website, do not purchase anything from it; there are

many other online stores to shop from.”

And to avoid fraud, “Be aware of your surroundings when talking about your account. Check who can overhear you or see what you’re doing when using a public wifi hotspot.

The guide was created by Mastercard, Child & Youth Finance International, ParentPay, nimbl and Mirador Digital, with contributions from a range of organizations in the financial sector.

Speaking to financial services providers, the guide advises, “The minor’s needs, interests and levels of comprehension would form the basis for all product communications.

Parent-targeted initiatives and minor-friendly communication are both emphasized. The guide suggests that annual fees and monthly bills would be sent to the parent, but communications from the financial services provider can encourage that they are reviewed regularly with the child.

Billimoria gives an example of minor-centered financial service happening right now in Uganda, where the Private Education Development Network has collaborated with the software development company Oratec Ltd. to create an automated school deposit and withdrawal management information system to promote savings among students.

Offering the opportunity for kids to understand how e-banking works by opening and managing their own account, the system also enables financial service providers to equip students with banking skills and fund financial inclusion through mobile money initiatives,” she wrote.

Billimoria warns that money saved in a piggy bank could be stolen or lost in a fire or flood.

She says everyone at Child and Youth Finance International believes that young people have a right to safe and appropriate child and youth friendly savings accounts at formal financial institutions.


Featured Image: Child plays at running a shop, June 2015, United Kingdom (Photo by Sarah Joy) Creative commons license via Flickr

Billboard- 970x250-min-min

Create finance projects through Maximpact’s Advisory and discover project services for all types of business and organizations.  Find the right expertise for your finance projects through Maximpact consulting network.  Contact us at info(@)maximpact.com and tell us what you need.

Top 10 U.S. Carbon Market Trends of 2017

LouisianaTribalLand

Sea level rise caused by climate warming has inundated Louisiana’s Isle de Jean Charles, displacing the Biloxi-Chitimacha Tribe, the first official U.S. climate refugees. (Photo by Karen Apricot) Creative commons license via Flickr.

By Sunny Lewis

PORTLAND, Oregon, January 24, 2017 (Maximpact.com News) – The Climate Trust, a nonprofit that specializes in mobilizing conservation finance for climate benefit, announced its fourth annual prediction list of 10 carbon market trends to watch in the coming year.

Trends range from U.S. citizens becoming climate refugees in one of the hottest years on record, to more native tribes joining carbon markets, to China taking the global climate leadership role, to environmental justice concerns playing an increased role in climate policy decisions.

These trends were identified by The Climate Trust based on interactions with their group of working partners: governments, investors, project developers, large businesses, and the philanthropic community.

Our team has identified areas of potential advancement, despite the anticipated inaction around climate at the federal level,” said Sean Penrith, executive director for The Climate Trust.

This year, more than ever, we felt there was a need for positivity, and have primarily chosen to share industry insights that are positive in nature, yet still strongly based in reality,” said Penrith. “We expect that the New Year will bring together unlikely, yet strong, domestic partnerships with corresponding resolve to address climate change, and we look forward to seeing what we can accomplish by banding together.

The Top 10 U.S. Carbon Market Trends

1. As our nation heads into uncertain times with respect to climate change policy and action, states, cities, and regional collaborative groups are going to lead the fight against climate change.

In New York City, former Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned that if the Trump Administration withdraws from the Paris Accord, mayors from 128 cities will pick up the cause.

In the Midwest, wind turbines continue to rise out of the cornfields.

In Oregon, U.S. District Judge Ann Aiken recently issued an opinion and order  denying the U.S. government and fossil fuel industry’s motions to dismiss a climate change lawsuit filed by 21 young people.

In Oregon, the Department of Environmental Quality is wrapping up the draft considerations for a cap-and-trade program for the state. In the vacuum created by a Scott Pruitt-led EPA, and a Rex Tillerson-led State Department, rulings like the one issued by Judge Aiken, and statements like the one from California Governor Jerry Brown challenging Trump on climate change, indicate where the action on climate change is going to be for the next four years.

2. Progressive states and foundations will pick up support for domestic climate finance in the absence of federal action. We expect that climate denial from federal leaders will alarm foundations and progressive states. Many foundations previously had an international climate focus, and The Climate Trust anticipates that these institutions will refocus on their U.S. agenda.

The political will for carbon pricing will grow in progressive states, demanding more immediate state action.

Increasingly, public entities are aware that their dollars are most effectively used when they leverage private capital. In 2017, states and foundations will look for opportunities to mitigate risks to private climate finance providers investing in the United States through new financial mechanisms like first loss capital contributions, loan guarantees, credit enhancements, and other new structures.

YouthPlaintiffs

The 21 young plaintiffs in Our Childrens’ Trust’s landmark lawsuit against the federal government celebrate the judge’s order backing their right to sue. November 2016 (Photo courtesy Our Childrens’ Trust) Post for media use.

3. Global climate litigation campaigns will gain momentum during 2017, legitimizing our children’s right to a healthy planet.

This is no ordinary lawsuit,” U.S. District Judge Ann Aiken wrote in her ruling on November 10, 2016 on a landmark case filed in Oregon by 21 young people and Our Children’s Trust. The plaintiffs allege that over the last 50 years, the government, including President Barack Obama, violated their constitutional rights and imperiled their future by failing to adequately reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Also acting as a plaintiff is world-renowned climate scientist Dr. James Hansen, serving as guardian for future generations and his granddaughter, who is a youth plaintiff in the case.

Whether the case is heard in federal court or settled, it provides a solid legal foundation for future climate litigation, and gives hope to the growing ranks of youth climate activists and their supporters.

We believe that more judges will acknowledge that the climate change crisis is within their purview, and that the constitutional rights of youth plaintiffs will be upheld against other governmental branches.

The world is watching this historic precedent set in Oregon. We predict the optimism gained from this victory will encourage judges and activists to look to the courts to validate the science behind climate change and allow judicial systems to require governments to take tangible action.

4. Private industry picks up U.S. government slack, making progress towards Paris commitments. During his campaign, President-elect Trump referred to climate change as a Chinese hoax and asserted that he will cancel the Paris Agreement. While he has walked back these statements, most recently saying that “nobody really knows” if climate change is real, his choice of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency suggests that Trump is going to try and make his campaign promises.

In the days after the November 2016 election, business leaders called on Trump to honor America’s agreement to the Paris Accord. Savvy business leaders and people like Bill Gates who recently drew attention to his $1 billion clean-technology fund, not only understand that climate change is real, but understand that taking no action will have a negative impact on their bottom line.

Progress will be made toward our U.S. Paris commitments due to the efforts of private industry. The Climate Trust anticipates that the Trump Administration will be left on the sidelines while the rest of the world rallies to meet the commitments made in Paris to keep greenhouse gas emissions at levels that will prevent global climate change increasing more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

5. Environmental justice community concerns are increasingly built into climate policy discussions throughout the United States. The environmental justice community in California has brought into sharp focus the need to balance the impact on disadvantaged communities with climate policy and programs.

Meeting the ambitious greenhouse gas goals now required by law in California in the cheapest manner possible is a central equity issue.

There will be continued attention given to these environmental justice concerns both in California and across the country as state climate policy evolves.

6. U.S. citizens become climate refugees in one of the hottest years on record. The top 10 hottest years in human history have all occurred since 1998, and 2016 is among them. It is anticipated that this continued trend will give rise to an increasing number of climate refugees within U.S. borders.

The Biloxi-Chitimacha Tribe in Louisiana is considered the first official community of climate refugees in this country. Whether it’s a 1,000-year flooding event in Louisiana, or wildfires on the west coast, global warming is altering the country in ways that will displace thousands of Americans.

This changing geography will necessitate the development of new solutions that not only sequester carbon, but also focus on adaptation. Some of these solutions are already under development, such as the Blue Carbon Initiative, which seeks to restore coastal wetlands to sequester carbon in plants and soils and protect against dangerous storm surges.

7. More native tribes will join carbon markets. The California Compliance Offset Protocol, U.S. Forest Projects, now has more than 34 million offset credits issued, including over 7.7 million tons from properties owned by Native American Tribes; nine projects located in six different states. The second largest individual issuance to date in the California carbon market is from the White Mountain Apache tribe project in Arizona.

Tribes that have taken part in carbon transactions have indicated that credit sales provide a new way to make money while improving wildlife habitat, expanding the tribe’s natural resource program, and acquiring and protecting land in its ancestral territory.

Last year, the protocol rules for the California market were expanded beyond the lower 48 U.S. states to include Alaska, opening the door for even more tribes to engage.

8. China takes the lead in carbon markets, encouraging linkages. The year of the rooster in the Chinese calendar is also the year China will take a leading role in using markets to fight global climate change.

After several years of piloting regional emissions trading programs, China will launch a national system that will cover over four billion tons of greenhouse gas emissions, making it twice as large as the next biggest market in Europe.

As a developing nation and large emitter, China’s bold commitment to carbon markets will send a signal that will be felt in America and beyond,” says Erika Anderson, a climate change attorney doing business in China.  

9. U.S.-based institutional investors will increase commitments to investments that hedge out carbon risk. Following the example of Norway’s sovereign fund, and other large European institutional investors, U.S.-based pensions and family offices will continue to de-risk their portfolios from the negative impacts of climate change, and take advantage of opportunities in the sustainable real assets space.

Lindsey Brace Martinez, founder of StarPoint Advisors, LLC and advisor to institutional investors and asset managers, says, “Given the prevailing sentiment for a low return environment, U.S. institutional investors are looking for investment managers who have a competitive edge and can deliver value over the long-term. Investment managers who systematically review and update their risk management approaches and apply their expertise through focused strategies will have a competitive edge.”

10. California Air Resources Board prevails in CalChamber lawsuit and commits to cap and trade. A long-standing lawsuit filed by the California Chamber of Commerce, Morning Star Packing Co.,and the National Association of Manufacturers has hung over the cap and trade market. The lawsuit argues that the auctioning of the cap and trade allowances constitutes an illegal tax since it does not have the approval of two-thirds of the Legislature.

Oral arguments are scheduled in Sacramento for January 24, 2017.

There are three possible outcomes for the lawsuit. It may be deemed a tax, and cause California to have a cap and trade system without the auction element unless the Legislature approves with a two-thirds vote.

It could be deemed a regulatory fee, and thus uphold the validity of the allowance auctions. Or, the third possibility is that the court finds that the auction is neither a tax nor a fee but something else not subject to the strictures of tax voting requirements under the state constitution.

The Climate Trust believes that this third option will be the outcome of the suit and be a complete victory for the cap and trade program.

In 2016, a number of our predictions came to fruition, including an increased number of institutions committing to divest from fossil fuel companies as part of the transition to a clean energy future,” said Kristen Kleiman, director of investments for The Climate Trust.

The divest movement has provided a valuable market signal to support the needed flows of conservation finance,” Kleiman said. “Riding this wave of interest from large institutions, late last year, The Trust executed a milestone contract with the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, securing a $5.5M Program-Related Investment to seed our first-of-its-kind carbon investment fund.


Billboard- 970x250-min-min

 Maximpact’s consultant network has a wide range of environmental experts that can help your organization.  Find capacity services at Maximpact Advisory and help your NGO and increase the capacity of your organization to influence society. Contact us at info(@)maximpact.com and tell us what you need.