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8 – 10 October – Live online Webinar: Register before the 3rd October – LAST CALL

integratedwastemanagement

Need training in Sustainable Solid Waste Management?

This is, literally, a growing global issue and more and more people will need to acquire skills to combat waste. Recent estimates put global waste production from cities alone at 1.5 billion tons, and project an increase to 2.3 billion tons by 2025 – this is a problem that’s only going to get worse. It’s vital we educate people to deal with all the related issues and impact of global waste.

About the Training

Training fee: $350

Training Period: 3 full days

Where: Live online – you can attend from anywhere

What will the training cover 

During the training you will learn about:

  • how to assess local conditions and needs
  • what solutions to choose to solve identified waste problems
  • most important elements of integrated sustainable waste management.
  • the main phases of a solid waste system.
  • the actors involved, the main phases of a solid waste system.
  • the enabling environment conditioning waste management and the main drivers steering solid waste policy development.

Want to deliver compelling workshops that make an impact? The training will demonstrate the most advanced tools and techniques available in solid waste management, and will instruct you on how to employ them in participatory interventions with local stakeholders, especially during decision making processes related to solid waste management.

Click here to see the agenda

 Key Benefits of Waste Management Training

  • Increase understanding of the wide range of environmental, health and social issues related to waste disposal and management.
  • Understand the skills required to prevent pollution and to transform waste back into wealth and place that wealth at the service of the community.
  • Identify practical, integrated and sustainable solutions for waste management and pass these onto NGOs in the sector.
  • Understand how to transfer knowledge to others – a direct benefit of this training.

About the Trainer

Jeroen IJgosse is an urban planner, urban environmental specialist and planning process facilitator, with 24 years of professional activity in waste management and sustainable sanitation in Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe. He holds a MSc International Development Technology Sciences; Urban Planning for Developing Economies, from the University of Technology of Eindhoven, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

During his professional career, he has worked within the international development sector, 20 years working and living permanently in 5 Latin American countries (incl. Brazil, Peru and Costa Rica), through long term assignments in countries including India, Egypt, Nicaragua, Belize and Colombia, and short-term assignments including Mozambique, Nepal, El Salvador, Surinam. He has worked with a broad range of stakeholders at national and international level, on waste related projects funded by EU, Worldbank, IADB, KfW, GiZ, DGIS, US-AID, DFID, UN-Habitat and other international donors.

Sign up now! We look forward to welcoming you to our Waste Management Training programme and to help others combat this global issue. Click here to register or contact info@maximpact.com

Waste Management and its Challenges

Waste Management and its_Challenges

‘Jaipur cows eating trash’ Creative Commons license via Wikimedia Commons

The Importance of Integrated Sustainable Waste Management

To manage waste in an effective way appears to be one of the greatest challenges facing humanity and the planet. The ongoing trend of industrialization and economic growth have resulted in increased municipal solid waste especially in cities with high population. With recent estimates putting the global waste production from cities alone at 1.5 billion tons, and projecting an increase to 2.3 billion tons by 2025, it’s a problem that’s only going to get worse.

The concern is serious, as increasing quantity of waste negatively impacts every aspect of society. Failing to address the problem strategically and on sustainable way leads to the creation of long term environmental and public health disasters influencing national economies on entirely destructive way.

Identifying the needs

If not addressed effectively, waste generated has a negative impact on all countries regarless of their socio-economic development. However, developing countries with less developed infrastructure have further to go in order to tackle the problem. As urbanization continues to take place, the management of solid waste is becoming a major public health and environmental concern in urban areas of many developing countries.

Developing countries often display an array of problems regarding their typical waste management system, including low collection coverage and irregular collection services, unpolished open dumping and burning without air and water pollution control, and the handling and control of informal waste picking or scavenging activities. Development of effective solid waste management systems in developing countries has been even more demanding due to absence of technical, financial, institutional, economic, and social factors.

In other words, developing countries frequently suffer from the lack of human resources with technical expertise necessary for solid waste management planning and operation. This is often combined with insufficient and/or poorly managed funds allocated to resolving waste problems, as well as with weak legislation and coordination among main institutions in charge of waste issues. All these influence on low public awareness and education on waste and its devastating impact.

Where to start then and how to change existing practice? There are several crucial factors involved in identifying the needs of local communities. The adequate assessment of the composition and volume of waste can be a deciding factor in choosing an efficient way to manage its disposal. Other important measures include examining the options for introducing the most effective legislation and regulations, ensuring accessibility of waste for collection, and the existing level of public awareness.

In each country, region and community we must identify opportunities to minimize waste output. This is being addressed in many countries by building a system

Why it’s so important

When efficient waste management isn’t present the impact on the community can be devastating. The waste poses a threat to the environment. Polluted water flowing from dumps and disposal sites can cause serious pollution of the surface water, which can also impact marine life, and ultimately leads to a decline in health of the local population.

A build up of solid waste can also lead to soil contamination, especially during the rainy season, which spreads the secreted toxins at a quicker rate. Relocating waste management to areas sufficiently removed from public spaces to allow for incineration or disposal in a safe manner helps to decrease the risk of exposure to biohazards and reduces pest infestation.

Uncontrolled waste management can lead to medical and healthcare waste being mixed with household waste. This increases the risk of poisoning or injury to children and adults who are working sorting waste.

Indiscriminate burning of waste can cause major air pollution and increases greenhouse emissions. As well as the immediate affect on the local air quality, often accompanied by an increase in respiratory diseases, it also contributes to global warming.

A build up of solid waste promotes the breeding of rats, flies and mosquitos, all of which will cause the spread of disease.

How waste management can help a community

When waste management is handled properly it has several benefits for the local community. As well as avoiding the negative impact of the above problems, it can also be a vehicle for change. Through job creation and an improvement in health whole communities can be given a new lease of life.

Recycling can also be used to reduce future waste by ensuring a portion of solid waste is reused. Whether it’s on a small local scale, or a larger industrial scale, many useful things can be generated from proper waste disposal. Everything from electricity generated through incineration and composting, to furniture being built from recycled plastics, are projects being refined all over the world.

Recycling also helps to conserve local resources by reducing the need to manufacture using new raw materials.

Leading the charge in an ever-changing world

With political instability, social unrest and poverty gripping some nations, the ability to educate and implement efficient waste management can be a challenge. There are several NGOs working all over the world to identify and train key individuals, work with whole communities, and implement sustainable change within municipalities and governments.

Committed specialists with decades of experience are taking it on their own shoulders to help underdeveloped communities to take control of their own waste management, and improve their overall health and local environment in the process. They are being proactive in educating communities, arranging waste collection, and ensuring the infrastructure is in place to maximise the disposal.

Through qualified training, experts and professionals working with NGOs, communities, governments and others in waste related sector can obtain the necessary technical skills as well as training skills and how to train others in the topics.

Maximpact and qualified technical training expert in waste management has designed a training with the following objectives:

  • To demonstrate understanding of the wide range of environmental, health and social issues related to waste disposal and management
  • To understand what skills are required to prevent pollution and to transform waste back into wealth and place that wealth at the service of the community
  • To identify practical, integrated and sustainable solutions for waste management
  • To enhance practical skills of NGOs in delivering waste management projects
  • To obtain training of trainers skill sets in order for participants to carry out trainings to their communities
  • To understand how to transfer knowledge to others

 

Find out more about the training


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About the Training-of-Trainers in Waste Management

Your greatest asset is your knowledge.

Maximpact Trainings are carried out by a live trainer through an online conference classroom, where participants are able to ask questions, participate in discussions and conduct practical exercises.

This method of delivering training is one of the most efficient ways for you to obtain the needed knowledge within the set training days. This is perfect for those who find it difficult to set time aside to do self-paced e-courses.

Training is carried out by a technical field and training expert. This allows the participants to receive today’s most advanced information on industry practices and know-how.

Participants will acquire not only first-hand knowledge but also essential tools, tips and tricks to carry out their job tasks on the most efficient way.

The training is designed around the “Learning by Doing” methodology, where practical exercises simulating real life situations will be comprised of 60% of the training.

Upon successful completion of training you receive a certificate acknowledging your training accomplishment.

After each training, Maximpact offers post- training mentoring virtual assistance where trainees can reach out to the expert trainer for further advice and support.

Find out more

Why Training is Important?

If you were given the choice between two different pilots—one was trained, the other not—which one would you choose? But what if there was no “up-front” cost for the untrained pilot? You still wouldn’t do it? Yet many business owners do not recognize the importance of employee training.

Reasons for training are:

  • Training boosts motivation and self confidence resulting in happier staff
  • Staying up to date and ability to perform different skills will keep your value higher
  • Obtaining new knowledge and skill sets will impact positively on your performance both quantitative and qualitative
  • Increased productivity and possibly fee/salary increase

Don’t miss your opportunity to invest into your own capacity.

Register now


Maximpact_services

E-waste Proliferates as Incomes Rise, Prices Fall

The Rwanda E-Waste Recycling Facility in Rwanda's Bugesera District, the second largest such facility in Africa. This is a Rwanda Green Fund investment. September 2017 (Photo by Rwanda Green Fund) Creative Commons license via Flickr

The Rwanda E-Waste Recycling Facility in Rwanda’s Bugesera District, the second largest such facility in Africa. This is a Rwanda Green Fund investment. September 2017 (Photo by Rwanda Green Fund) Creative Commons license via Flickr

By Sunny Lewis

BONN, Germany, December 14, 2017 (Maximpact.com News) – Last year, the world generated e-waste – everything from end-of-life refrigerators and TV sets to solar panels, mobile phones and computers – equal in weight to 1.23 million fully loaded 18-wheeler heavy-duty freight trucks, enough to form a line from New York to Bangkok and back.

A new report on global e-waste shows a staggering 44.7 million metric tonnes (Mt) generated in 2016, up 3.3 Mt or eight percent from 2014.

Experts foresee a further 17 percent increase, to 52.2 million metric tonnes of e-waste by 2021, in this, the fastest growing part of the world’s domestic waste stream.

Only 20 percent of 2016’s e-waste – discarded products with a battery or plug – is documented to have been collected and recycled, despite rich deposits of gold, silver, copper, platinum, palladium and other high value recoverable materials.

The conservatively estimated value of recoverable materials in last year’s e-waste was US$55 billion, more than the 2016 Gross Domestic Product of most countries.

These numbers come from the new report, “Global E-waste Monitor 2017,”  issued this week.

The report is a collaborative effort of the United Nations University (UNU), represented through its Sustainable Cycles (SCYCLE) Programme hosted by UNU’s Bonn-based Vice-Rectorate in Europe, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), and the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA).

Jakob Rhyner, vice-rector, United Nations University, said, “The world’s e-waste problem continues to grow. Improved measurement of e-waste is essential to set and monitor targets, and identify policies. National data should be internationally comparable, frequently updated, published, and interpreted.”

“Existing global and regional estimates based on production and trade statistics do not adequately cover the the health and environmental risks of unsafe treatment and disposal through incineration or landfilling,” said Rhyner.

About four percent of 2016’s e-waste is known to have gone into landfills. Experts estimate that about 76 percent, or 34.1 Mt, is likely to have ended up incinerated, in landfills, recycled in informal backyard operations or remains stored in homes.

On a per capita basis, the report shows a rising trend in the amount of e-waste generative.

Falling prices now make electronic and electrical devices affordable for most people worldwide while encouraging early equipment replacement and new acquisitions in wealthier countries.

As a result, the average worldwide per capita e-waste generated was 6.1 kilograms (13.4 pounds) in 2016, up five percent from 5.8 kg (12.7 pounds) in 2014.

The highest per capita e-waste generators – at 17.3 kilograms (38.1 pounds) per inhabitant – were Australia, New Zealand and the other the nations of Oceania, with only six percent of their e-waste formally collected and recycled.

Europe, including Russia, is the second largest generator of e-waste per inhabitant with an average of 16.6 kg (36.5 pounds) per person.

However, Europe has the highest collection rate, 35 percent.

The Americas generate 11.6 kg (25.5 pounds) per inhabitant and collect only 17 percent, comparable to the collection rate in Asia, which is 15 percent.

However, at 4.2 kg (9.2 pounds) per inhabitant, Asia generates only about one third of America’s e-waste per capita.

Africa, meanwhile, generates 1.9 kg (4.1 pounds) per inhabitant, with little information available on its collection rate.

ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao said, “Environmental protection is one of the three pillars of sustainable development and ITU is at the forefront of advocating for the safe disposal of waste generated by information and communication technologies. To this end ITU has produced several recommendations that help deal with e-waste and the Global E-waste Monitor will be an added resource to assist governments develop better management strategies, standards and policies to reduce the adverse health and environmental effects of e-waste.”

The three Electrical and Electronical Equipment (EEE) categories that contribute the most to e-waste are also growing the fastest.

These three EEE categories, which already constitute 75 percent of global e-waste by weight – 33.6 of the total 44.7 million metric tonnes – will also see the fastest growth.

Top of the list is small equipment, such as vacuum cleaners, microwaves, ventilation equipment, toasters, electric kettles, electric shavers, scales, calculators, radio sets, video cameras, electrical and electronic toys, small electrical and electronic tools, small medical devices, small monitoring and control instruments. In 2016: 16.8 million metric tonnes was generated in this category, with an annual growth rate of four percent a year to 2020.

Next comes large equipment, such as washing machines, clothes dryers, dishwashers, electric stoves, large printing machines, copying equipment and solar photovoltaic panels. In 2016, 9.2 million metric tonnes was generated in this category, with an annual growth of four percent a year to 2020.

Third is temperature exchange equipment, like refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners and heat pumps. In 2016: 7.6 million metric tonnes was generated in this category, with an annual growth of six percent per year to 2020.

Expected to grow less quickly by weight due to miniaturization is small IT and telecommunication equipment, such as mobile phones, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), pocket calculators, routers, personal computers, printers and telephones. In 2016: 3.9 Mt generated, with an annual growth of two percent a year to 2020.

Little growth is expected in the category of lamps, such as fluorescent lamps, high intensity discharge lamps and LED lamps.

In 2016: 0.7 million metric tonnes of waste was generated in this category, with an annual growth rate of one percent per year to 2020.

Expected to decline by weight in years to come are:

Screens, such as televisions, monitors, laptops, notebooks, tablets, as heavy CRT screens are replaced with flat panel displays. In 2016: 6.6 million metric tonnes of waste was generated in this category, with an annual decline of three percent per year to 2020.

Each product within the six e-waste categories has a different lifetime profile, which means that each category has different waste quantities, economic values, and potential environmental and health impacts if recycled inappropriately.

Antonis Mavropoulos, president, International Solid Waste Association, said, “We live in a time of transition to a more digital world, where automation, sensors and artificial intelligence are transforming all the industries, our daily lives and our societies. E-waste is the most emblematic by-product of this transition and everything shows that it will continue to grow at unprecedented rates.”

The fastest growth of EEE sales is in developing countries.

There is an increasing number of applications and services in such areas as health, education, government, entertainment, and commerce, delivered at increasingly high speeds attracting more users to a growing number of networks.

The report notes that with a population of 7.4 billion, the world now has 7.7 billion mobile-cellular subscriptions. More than eight in 10 people on Earth are covered by a mobile broadband signal.

Some 3.6 billion people – close to half the world’s population, now use the Internet, up from 20.5 percent in 2007. Roughly half of humanity has a computer and Internet access at home. Some 48 percent of households have a computer, up from 30.2 percent in 2007, and 54 percent have Internet access, up from 23 percent in 2007.

In addition to basic prepaid mobile cellular services and handsets becoming more affordable worldwide, prices are falling for many other types of equipment such as computers, peripheral equipment, TVs, laptops and printers

The report calls for stepped up global efforts to better design components in electrical and electronic equipment to facilitate reuse and recycling of electronics, greater capture and recycling of old electronics, and better tracking of e-waste and the resource recovery process.

Encouragingly, more countries are adopting e-waste legislation, the report says. Today 66 percent of the world’s people, living in 67 countries, are covered by national e-waste management laws, up from 44 percent in 61 countries in 2014, an increase caused mainly by India’s adoption of legislation last year.

Still, the report states, only 41 countries quantify their e-waste generation and recycling streams officially and “the fate of a large majority of e-waste (34.1 of 44.7 Mt) is simply unknown.”


Featured Image: One of many dismantlers of electronic waste, location unknown. December 2017 (Photo by ITU) Posted for media use.

NGOs Grow With Maximpact’s Training-of-Trainers

Capacity building and NGO’s external benefits (accountability to donors and local communities)

For many years now, NGO sector has been acting as an agent of change empowering and fostering local communities towards sustainable socio-economic development.

NGO programs that focus on peace building, democratic governance, human rights as well as fighting poverty and inequality are implemented around the world.

Yet, no matter how many successful projects have been created, in the final phase of implementation the last challenge remains – ensuring project sustainability.

To increase the chances that activities and policies fostered by NGOs will be integrated and utilized within targeted community groups upon project completion, it is helpful to have people within the project target group who know how to maintain new practices and policies once the NGO staff has completed their mission.

One of the most effective ways to carry out this goal is capacity building.

Capacity building has become one of the most important measures for ensuring project sustainability and is requested by the donor community.

Building the capacity of NGOs and projects to change negative perceptions, inefficient practices, and harmful behavior of governments, decision makers and policy makers is an emerging requirement usually implemented by reputable, successful NGOs.

Ensuring that NGOs have the capacity to undertake this important outreach means training NGO staffers, who will then be able to effectively communicate with community members and train them to carry out the core necessary tasks to ensure project sustainability and positive impact.

NGOs can build upon the success of their core programs by sharing their skills with others in the community, whether that community is a village, town, state, country or the entire world.

But the sharing of skills is a skill in itself. It requires training to sharpen effective communications strategies, including active listening, outreach that will be accepted by the community, assessment and follow up.

Maximpact provides need-based and sector-specific tailored training to strengthen the capacity of NGOs, projects and programs worldwide. Organizations can carry out training in any area they need, such as fundraising, or select Agriculture, WASH and Waste Management Training-of-Trainers.

The Internal Benefits of Capacity Building for an NGO

Capacity building is required to demonstrate an NGO’s accountability for and sustainability of project results to donors and local communities. It also is essential in growing the internal abilities of an NGO to perform its mission in the most efficient and effective way.

In order to adapt to the fast-changing environment of development and humanitarian assistance, many NGOs require new skills of their staff members. Internal communication and coordination of complex programs can pose challenges to staffers. Strengthening their ability to collaborate with partners becomes even more important.

Through its Training-of-Trainers programs designed for NGOs, Maximpact offers solutions to these and other common challenges faced by the NGO community.

NGOs benefit through such programs. By becoming trainers, NGO leaders can extend their services, enhancing the reputation of their organization and generating new revenue streams.

While building their own skills as trainers, NGO leaders are empowered to motivate community members to become trainers themselves, expanding the knowledge of the whole community.

ToT in WASH, Waste Management and Agriculture / TRIPLE BENEFIT

Maximpact offers customized training programs designed to serve NGOs working in the field of AgricultureWASH and Waste .

These programs offer triple benefits. They train participants in: technical, operational and preparation skills.

The Maximpact Training-of-Trainers program will graduate a competent and enthusiastic staff of trainers equipped with the skills and resources to transform local areas through sustainable agricultural methods tailored to local conditions and cultures.

The Maximpact Training-of-Trainers program for WASH consists of 11 main modules covering water pollution, water scarcity and climate change; and the practical possibilities for sustainable financing.

The Waste Management Training-of-Trainers program will introduce recent technology and most advanced techniques in waste management.

All these programs are expected to raise the skills of the NGO sector to create and deliver their own WASH, Agriculture and Waste capacity building programs.

Based on the specific needs of an NGO, the Maximpact Training-of-Trainers programs offer the flexibility to select one or more of the presented modules and/or request training in any additional sector-related topics.

Maximpact will adapt the program to the local context where trainings take place, as well as to the nature and knowledge level of training participants.

All Maximpact programs are in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, incorporating the climate change and gender aspects of these ambitious goals.

To ensure sustainability, Maximpact has created a Post-Training Mentorship Program to further support the training participants in applying their training to their day-to-day work.

Participants of Maximpact capacity building training programs enhance the socio-environmental impact and sustainability of their NGO projects. Their communities experience upward economic mobility as the graduates, in turn, teach local enterprises the skills they need to succeed.

Implementation modalities and service conditions

Maximpact trainers can provide either virtual or in-house training, or both.

The training service fee will depend on:

  • the number of topics or modules selected
  • the mode of training delivery – in-house or virtual
  • the number of days during which the training will take place
  • the choice of national or international expert to conduct the training

To get started, the NGO fills in the pre-training assessment form, click for link: Maximpact Training Form

Then, Maximpact finds the right expert and submits a service proposal to that expert for review and approval.

To receive a quote for your organizations training, please contact info@maximpact.com.


Maximpact+WASTE

Rio Summer Olympics ‘Embrace’ Sustainability

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The Estádio do Maracanã is a 78,838 seat open-air stadium in the city of Rio owned by the Rio de Janeiro state government. South America’s largest stadium, it will be the venue for the Rio Olympics opening ceremonies on August 5 and closing ceremonies on August 21. (Photo by Luciano Silva) Creative Commons license via Flickr

By Sunny Lewis

RIO de JANEIRO, Brazil, July 14, 2016 (Maximpact.com News) – A new set of sustainability measures to support the greening of the Rio Summer Olympic Games were agreed by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the 2016 Olympics and Paralympics Organizing Committee as far back as 2013.

Expressing its commitment to achieving sustainability, the “Embrace” Rio 2016 plan is based on three pillars: Planet, People and Prosperity, and has been established with the input of the federal, state and municipal governments.

The slogan “Embrace” Rio 2016 is being used in all Games communications related to the Sustainability Plan. The idea behind the name is to engage people, inviting them to be part of the transformation promoted by the event, which opens on Friday, August 5 and ends on Sunday, August 21.

A technical cooperation agreement with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) was signed at the launch of the sustainability program in August 2013. It expected to provide an evaluation plan and mediation around the subject of sustainability between Rio 2016 and the people of Brazil.

Denise Hamú, UNEP’s representative in Brazil, said, “Our goal is to integrate sustainability in all organizational processes, reducing the impact of the Games and setting an example of good practice for society as a whole. Together, sports and environment are powerful tools for sustainable development. For this reason, the UNEP has worked in partnership with the Olympic Movement over the last two decades.

Sustainability round tables originated during dialogue between the Organizing Committee and civil society groups in 2013. They began in 2014 and examined six topics in depth: urban mobility, climate change, sustainability education, protection of children and teenagers, diversity and inclusion, and transparency.

The Games will inevitably generate environmental impacts,” says the Organizing Committee. “We are talking about high consumption of water, energy, raw materials, food and so on. Rio 2016 undertakes to use all resources conscientiously and rationally, prioritizing certified, reusable and recyclable materials.”

 Discussions led to awareness, and the Organizing Committee has acted responsibly in many ways during planning and preparation for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

  • 100 percent certified wood: Rio 2016 undertook to buy all the timber items required for the Games from sources with chain of custody certification. That means that the timber is logged sustainably and traceability is guaranteed from the time the timber leaves the forest through to the end user.
  • Sustainable headquarters: Rio 2016 has its headquarters in a temporary building. After the Olympics are over, it will be taken down, and 80 percent of the material will be reused in future structures. While in use, the building consumes 70 percent less energy than ordinary buildings. Timers on bathroom wash basins, intelligent flushes and a rainwater collection system enables the Organizing Committee to cut water consumption.
  • Material life-cycle analysis: The Organizing Committee has analyzed the life-cycles of 106 materials being used by the Games visual identity team to ensure conscientious and sustainable choices and minimize their environmental impact.

With the intention of delivering low-impact Games, the Organizing Committee has completed a study of the carbon footprint of the Rio Games and defined an emissions management strategy, based on impact measurement, cutting emissions, mitigation where possible and offsetting what cannot be mitigated.

To avert some of the consequences of energy use at the Games, Rio 2016 and Worldwide TOP Partner Dow announced the most comprehensive carbon dioxide (CO2) offset program in Olympic Games history. As the Official Carbon Partner of Rio 2016, Dow will mitigate 500,000 tons of CO2 equivalents through third party-verified emissions reductions somewhere else.

  • Technology-based carbon mitigation plan: This plan aims to mitigate 100 percent of the emissions generated by the Rio 2016 Games, which will amount to 500,000 tonnes of co2eq direct emissions from operation of the Games and 1.5 million tonnes of co2eq from spectators. Mitigation projects involve the agriculture, manufacturing and civil engineering sectors, and they will reap short, medium and long-term benefits.
RioVLT

One of Rio’s new state-of-the-art trams makes its way through the new-look waterfront district (Photo by Bruno Bartholini / Porto Maravilha) Posted for media use

Known as the VLT, Rio’s new light rail system started running in June. The high-tech trams have transformed public transport in the city center and given a futuristic look to the business district. The trams connect Santos Dumont domestic airport to the long-distance bus station, running through the waterfront district and stopping along the way at new museums and the busy cruise ship terminal. More than 200,000 people have already used the service.

Fleets of buses and trucks will be fueled by diesel containing 20 percent recycled cooking oil. Biodiesel emits less carbon and sulphur than petroleum diesel. It is estimated that 20,000 oil collectors will be involved, boosting the development of this production chain.

  • Logistics efficiency program: Logistics are a major factor in boosting the Games’ CO2 emissions. Rio 2016 is designing an intelligent route model to cut transportation time, fuel consumption and carbon emissions for the more than 30 million items to be brought in for the Games.

Allowing for public involvement has been an key part of the Organizing Committee’s work. Initial dialogue with civil society took place in 2013 and brought together 34 representatives of 24 organizations to assess the content of the Sustainability Management Plan. These meetings were held annually until this year. Organizers hope they will encourage a strong and effective post-Games transformation network.

  • Rio Alimentação Sustentável: Since 2013, Rio 2016 has been working in partnership with this voluntary organization focusing on healthy, sustainable foods. It is proposed that the Games act as a driving force to improve this sector in Brazil.

Rio 2016 has entered into partnerships with the Marine Stewardship Council and Aquaculture Stewardship Council so that suppliers can obtain sustainability certification for fish and seafood to be eaten during the Games.

For Rio 2016, one of the key points is waste management, since large volumes of waste will be generated daily during the Games. The great challenge is to minimize waste and raise awareness among spectators, athletes, volunteers about the best way to dispose of and recycle waste.

  • Rio 2016 headquarters waste management: The Organizing Committee has been operating without buying plastic cups, reducing the number of printers available and not providing individual waste bins.
  • Guide to sustainability for packaging: One of the critical points in the generation of waste is packaging. With this in mind, in April 2013, Rio 2016 published a guide to sustainable packaging, in which the committee laid down sustainability options and mandatory requirements for this category of items, including labeling, eco-design, accessibility of information and packaging materials.
  • Games waste management strategies: The strategy began during the preparatory phase and will end when the venues are dismantled. Recycling cooperatives will be involved, and the strategy is based on this sequence: waste generation avoidance → minimizing volume → managing inevitable waste → promoting behavioral change. The strategy also includes treatment of organic waste through composting, in order to reduce the amount that is sent to landfills.
  • Olympic Games Impact (OGI) study: In 2014, the Organizing Committee published its first OGI study, carried out by the Rio de Janeiro Federal University School of Engineering and containing an analysis of 22 environmental, 76 socio-cultural and 25 economic indicators. The first edition relates to the period 2007-2013. A further three reports are to be published, covering impacts up to 2019.

After successfully hosting 44 test events, the Rio 2016 team and the venues are ready for action, with all the facilities receiving their final Olympic touches before the athletes start to arrive. The velodrome and equestrian venues, which were being monitored closely by the organizers, are in the final stage of preparation, and will be ready for the Games.

Golf as an Olympic sport was added just this year, and Rio created a golf course in the previously degraded area of Marapendi, west of Rio to host the new sport. Before the start of work, about 80 percent of the golf course land was degraded by sand extraction, and by the manufacturing and storage of pre-cast concrete.

Over at the Olympic Golf Course, Rio 2016 Sustainability Coordinator Carina Flores says the fresh vegetation has led to “a positive spiral for the development of wildlife.”

 Records indicate the presence of 263 animal species in the region today, as compared with 118 mapped before construction.

 An inspection of the golf course was conducted in December 2015, after a public civil action was filed by state prosecutors who questioned the environmental impact of the golf course construction work. Prosecutors, legal advisors and technicians environmentalists were among the inspectors.

 The forensic report from Brazil’s Court of Justice concluded, “The environmental gain in the region with the construction of the golf course is visible. In addition to the flora, which increased extensively, we can observe the different animal species that have returned to the area.

Rio 2016 is ready to welcome the world,” said International Olympic Committee Coordination Commission Chair Nawal el Moutawakel.

The Olympians of 2016 can look forward to living in an outstanding Olympic Village and competing in absolutely stunning venues,” she said. “From views of the Corcovado and Sugar Loaf Mountain to the new state-of-the-art facilities in Barra or Deodoro and the iconic Maracanã Stadium and Copacabana Beach, I cannot imagine more spectacular backdrops for the world’s top sportsmen and women to showcase their talents to a watching world.