Entries by Julia

Finding Protein to Feed 10 Billion

Broiler chickens raised for slaughter are crowded by the thousands into factory farm warehouses, January 3, 2008 (Photo by Farm Sanctuary) By Sunny Lewis GENEVA, Switzerland, January 8, 2019 (Maximpact.com News) – Sizzling juicy steaks, crispy fried chicken, tender pork sausages – all delicious but not sustainable as the world’s population balloons toward 10 billion finds […]

Europe Relegates Single-Use Plastics to History

Targeting the 10 plastic products most often found littering European beaches as well as abandoned fishing gear, the European Parliament and Council have reached a provisional political agreement with the Commission on new measures to tackle marine litter at its source.

COP24 Approves Paris Climate Accord Guidelines

Glaciers are still melting, sea levels are still rising, extreme weather is still causing floods and droughts, but the planet may be better able to withstand these consequences of climate change now that delegates at the UN’s COP24 climate change summit in Poland have adopted implementing guidelines for the 2015 Paris Accord.

Fashionably Cool

Keeping the planet cool is now seriously stylish in the exclusive world of fashion. To demonstrate commitment, the global fashion sector Monday launched the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action at the annual UN climate conference now underway in Katowice.

New Electrochemical Method Eliminates Mercury From Water

Water contaminated with mercury and other toxic heavy metals is a major cause of environmental damage and health problems worldwide. Now, researchers at Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology have devised a new way to clean contaminated water – through an electrochemical process.

UN, 28 Banks Draft Global Impact Standards

“The global banking industry is stepping up to the sustainability challenge,” said Satya Tripathi of India, UN assistant secretary-general, UN Environment. “I’m optimistic we’ll see a realignment of business practice – one that embraces the fact that green and socially responsible business is the best business.”

Trump Dismisses U.S. Government’s Climate Warnings

“Earth’s climate is changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization, primarily as a result of human activities,” warns a bombshell report from the U.S. government, released Friday. Produced by 300 scientists from 13 federal agencies, it finds that global warming is creating new risks and aggravating current vulnerabilities across the United States.

Supermarkets Purge Plastic With Shoppers’ Help

A London supermarket today became one of the world’s first to introduce dedicated Plastic Free Zones. The Thornton’s Budgens store in Camden’s Belsize Park has assembled more than 1,700 plastic-free products and displays them in marked zones.

Climate Change Raises Mosquito-Borne Disease Risk

Present-day climate change could result in the spread of deadly mosquito-borne diseases to new places or their return to areas where they have already been eradicated, scientists are warning, based on the largest-ever study of the mosquito evolutionary tree, going back 195 million years.

Big Wave of Support for Our Oceans

Financial contributions are rolling in to fund dozens of initiatives aimed at healing and protecting the oceans at the fifth annual Our Ocean Conference held on the Indonesian island of Bali October 29-30.

Making Fresh Water Out of Thin Air

An atmospheric water generator that condenses moisture in the air, making fresh drinking water, has won the Water Abundance XPrize worth US$1.5 million. The prize went to David Hertz and Laura Doss-Hertz co-founders of the Skysource/Skywater Alliance.

Innovative Reforestation Wins Ray of Hope Prize

A Brazilian team of entrepreneurs has won the $100,000 Ray C. Anderson Foundation 2018 Ray of Hope Prize for the Nucleário Planting System, an all-in-one reforestation solution that mimics elements of natural forest progression to reduce maintenance costs and improve seedling survival rates.

Tennessee River Microplastic Soup Shocks Scientists

Dr. Andreas Fath, professor of medical and life sciences at Germany’s Furtwangen University, broke a world record in 34 days this summer by swimming all 652 miles of the Tennessee River, from its headwaters in Knoxville, Tennessee, to its mouth in Paducah, Kentucky.

Grappling With an Avalanche of Waste

Due to the growing volume of plastic waste now being produced and the plastic waste import ban imposed by China on December 31, 2017, plastic wastes, primarily from Europe, Japan, and North America, are now adrift on the global market.

Bolstered by EU Billions, Greece Recovers

In the face of massive external and internal imbalances that resulted in loss of market access, in April 2010 Greece was forced to request financial assistance from its European and international partners. Unprecedented billions were provided, and now Greece is well along the road to recovery.

The World’s Greenest Countries Revealed

With ice caps melting at an alarming rate and worldwide coral reefs at risk of dying, we are becoming more aware of the role we play in combating global warming and saving the environment. But have you ever wondered if you’re living in a green country?

What Makes a City Smart?

By 2050 cities are forecast to be inhabited by 6.5 billion people, and making cities smarter to accommodate the population boom is on the minds of transportation experts around the world.

Creating Pure Colors the Rainbow Beetle Way

Picture a unique color-generation mechanism in nature that has the potential to create cosmetics and paints with purer, more vivid hues, or create screen displays on phones or tablets that project the same true image when viewed from any angle.

Getting Comfortable With Soft Robotics

Search-and-rescue robots that act without risk to first responders, a robotic gripper that grasps and moves objects these applications and many more just moved closer to reality with the development of a new technology in a Yale University lab.

Water Shortages Linked to Violence, Poverty

More nature-based solutions are urgently needed to avoid a violent global water crisis, warn the hosts of World Water Week 2018, which opened Sunday in Stockholm, attracting government leaders, water experts, development professionals and business representatives from throughout the world.

World’s Forests Going Up in Smoke

Chile has replaced many of its native forests with plantation forests to supply pulp and timber mills that produce paper and wood products. As a result, highly flammable non-native pine and eucalypt forests now cover the region.

EU & China Shape ‘Sustainable Blue Economy’

Two of the world’s largest ocean economies – the European Union and China – have agreed to work together “to improve the international governance of the oceans in all its aspects, including by combating illegal fishing and promoting a sustainable blue economy.

Never Turn Your Back on the Ocean

Famous Hawaiian swimmer and surfer Duke Kahanamoku always warned, “Never turn your back on the ocean.” He wanted people to guard against the physical danger of being hit by a wave from behind, and he wanted humans to show respect for the ocean – a warning that today is more urgent than ever.

Tidal Wave of Foreign Trash Hits Thailand

Government officials in Thailand are struggling to limit a waste scandal after discovering a massive amount of plastic and electronic waste was imported to the Southeast Asian country this year, often illegally, by factories involved in recycling.

Energy Intense Digital Currencies Can Disrupt Climate

Bitcoin, just one of the many digital currencies, currently consumes enough electricity to power Denmark. Failure to lower the use of energy by Bitcoin and similar Blockchain designs may prevent nations from reaching their climate change obligations under the Paris Agreement…

Gold Rush Beneath the Deepest Sea

Cold, dark, and under extreme pressure, the deep sea holds a wealth of unique and unusual species, habitats and ecosystems. And it contains rich mineral resources, some of them in unique or highly enriched concentrations.

Innovators Find Water Scarcity Solutions

“We have a water crisis, which is based on increasing population, urbanization and climate disruption. And there’s unsustainable use of our water,” said Argonne National Laboratory researcher Seth Darling. “Part of addressing this is through policy solutions, but we also need new, more energy-efficient and cost-effective technologies.”